Beat the exam stress

Almost everyone feels nervous before an exam. Butterflies in the stomach and worrying thoughts – ‘Will I be able to answer the questions?’ ‘Have I done enough revision?’ – are indications of exam stress that are probably familiar to all students. In fact, a certain amount of nervous tension probably helps us perform to the best of our ability, producing a rush of adrenaline that helps us to feel alert and focused. But too much anxiety can BLOCK thoughts, create a negative frame of mind, and lead to panic and potentially poor exam performance.

There are a number of things you can do to help manage exam stress and turn uncomfortable, panicky thoughts into more eased procedure.

1. Avoid stressful people.

Stress actually is contagious. During exam week, resist the urge to have a study session with your super-tense friend, especially if she’s complaining about all the work she has to do and breaking pencils all over the place. Her stress will only add to your stress.

2. Eat healthy and exercise.

This seems like a no-brainer, but it’s a wonder how many people forget it. Skip the sugar, which will make you crash, and go for snacks like granola bars, healthy cereal or fruits and veggies to keep your blood sugar stable. If you’re studying for a long period of time, eat some protein too. Also, try to get some form of exercise. Even a 10 minute walk will leave you calmer and more focused.

3. Being organised

If you find out exactly what you’re facing, you can work out a plan for dealing with it, and this will go a long way towards putting your mind at ease. Get hold of the right information from the start. Make sure you know how you will be examined, and what you’ll be examined on. If you can, get a copy of the syllabus. Catch up with anything you’ve missed, so that you’ve got all your notes up to date.

4. Plan a timetable

Try to start your revision in plenty of time. Take time to plan a revision timetable that’s realistic and still flexible, and linked to your exam timetable, so you revise subjects in the right order. In planning it, give yourself clear priorities and try to balance your revision with other demands on your time – meals, sleep, chores or other commitments, as well as time for relaxing. Identify your best time of day for studying.

5. Force yourself to take breaks.

For every hour or so that you work, take a 10 or 15 minute break. Let yourself do whatever you want (check Facebook, check out that guy sitting nearby, stare off into space, call a friend, etc.) for those 10-15 mins, then start working again. This gives your brain a little rest and will help keep you more focused when you are actually doing work.

6. Visualize it all going right.

Imagine yourself taking the test and feeling confident that you know all the information. Picture getting all of the answers right, and focus on how relaxed you feel. Then picture the A on your test paper. When you imagine a happy ending, that’s often what happens, because you make the decisions that lead to it without even realizing.

7. If you’ve studied all you can, get up your confidence!

When test-time rolls around, it’s time to get you into confidence mode. You’ve prepared as much as you could, and now it’s time to ace the test. The tip here is to do whatever works to convince yourself you are going to do really well. Again, I know this tip sounds a little crazy but you just have to try it for yourself. I think you’ll like the results.

Plan well and have a good sleep to face the exams. All the best.

Source: Internet

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How to overcome stress?

Life can be stressful; sometimes you’ll have to deal with ongoing stress positively. Stress can have a variety of causes such as family problems, job problems, financial difficulties, poor health, mechanical breakdowns, false expectations or even the death of someone close to you. It is important to recognize the causes. Knowing the cause will make it easy to overcome the same too. Everything can be put into place and things can be extremely fine only if you want to be. So overcoming stress is completely in your hands. It is easy until you believe it to be. All it takes is some time and sincere efforts made by you. Some of the tips to overcome stress are:

  • Exercise: Start doing exercise when you are under stress. This helps the body to excrete adrenaline and cortisol, which are released by adrenal glands. The secretion of these glands causes the feeling of stress. It also activates pituitary and hypothalamus glands which secrete “feel good” hormones called as Endorphins. These also have the capacity to reduce pains and improve the “well-being” sense.

 

  • Diversion: One of the reasons behind stress is letting your mind obsess over things that you can’t change. If you think on that issue, divert your mind. Go on a small walk, meet your old friends, if not call them, watch your favorite movie, go for window shopping, check out your old pictures, play with your pet or visit a park and see children playing.

 

  • Self-Hypnosis: If you feel how to overcome stress with self-hypnosis, the positive aspect in hypnosis is that, it will make you strong from inner side to overcome stress and depressions. It controls your mind and develops a “well-being” and “feel-good” environment around you.
  • Find a Hobby: Hobbies can be active or reflective; sometimes they can be both, like gardening. Hobbies may be shared, but often it’s enjoyable activity pursued or engaged in solitude. Hiking in forests and mountains work wonders for me. Helps me get perspective, step back from my troubles, see a bigger picture, be at one with nature. Also, try your hand at creative writing, poetry or keeping a journal. Research shows writing that analyzes our problems and expresses our emotions is stress relieving. If you can’t discover a hobby, I’d take that as a warning sign. You may actually be depressed. Loss of interest in things we once enjoyed, or loss of vitality in general, is a common symptom.
  • Learn to Let Go: When people are depressed/stressed they often are clinging to a belief, a situation or a person that is ignoring or denying key aspects of reality. They are reluctant to have a face-to-face, heart-to-heart talk or confrontation. And loss doesn’t just mean the death of a loved one. Loss can occur with the breakup of a relationship, having to start a new job or school (loss of familiar colleagues and friends) or a sense of losing control…as in excessive yelling and screaming. Loss of face or self-esteem along with anxiety and uncertainty often result.
  • Live in your means: too much of expectation can lead you to stress so make things simple and learn to live within your means. Sort out the complex things in your life may it be work load, studies or finance. Plan and act so that you achieve the desirable result.

So keep things simple and sorted and enjoy life without any stress.

Source: Internet

Team Communication Strategies

What is a team without coordination… and how can team members coordinate without a team leader? A team leader is a person who leads the team while giving each and every team member the right to be a leader in them. He not only possesses good leadership and guidance skills, but is also a good communicator. In the words of James Humes, “The art of communication is the language of leadership.” If the team has an effective leader who can communicate the goals and objectives of the team with the goals and objectives of the individual members through effective two way communication, then there is nothing that can stop the team from succeeding in achieving its goals. So what are some effective strategies for fostering good team communication? The next section discusses all this and more…

Effective Team Communication Strategies

So, what are some effective strategies that you can adopt in your team in order to achieve your set goals? When working as a team, remember that you are dealing with different individuals with different styles of working and understanding. What may seem right to one team member may seem to be inappropriate to another team member. Another point to be noted is that to work together as a ‘team’ it is important to meet deadlines and work with complete focus and coordination because each and every task is related to the overall goal achievement. Communication comes into play when each and every member must be conveyed their task, their point of contact and the deadline to finish their individual task so that they can be united for the complete functioning of the team. Many a time, lack of communication, or rather the ‘assumption’ those things have been communicated and perceived in the right manner when they actually are not, can create a lot of chaos and unnecessary delays in the team. For this, implementing certain team communication strategies is a must. These are discussed as under.

Use Reliable Channels of Communication
The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” ~ George Bernard Shaw
Communication is a two way process. Only passing the information is not enough, you need to make sure that the information you have passed is also understood in the same way as you intended. The human mind can perceive the same thing in different ways. So keep the languages simple leaving no room for misinterpretations and use appropriate channels to communicate the information and receive relevant feedback. An example for the same would be this. To communicate change in strategies or deadline dates, you can send out a notice on the internal network files which are easily accessed by everyone in your team. You can also hold a meeting for the same to make sure that everyone is aware of the changes and has understood the changes that need to be brought in the team working strategy. It is important to hold face to face meeting with the team members at least twice a week to make sure that everything necessary has been communicated and understood.

A Team has No ‘I’, it Has Only ‘We’
The achievements of an organization are the results of the combined effort of each individual.” ~ Vincent Lombardi
Yes, it is the combination of individual efforts of each and every team member that contributes to the overall success of the team in all. Therefore, it is always important to communicate in terms of ‘we’ and not ‘I’. This is because the way you communicate also influences the minds of the team members. Addressing concerns and important notices as a ‘team’ and not as a group of individuals is an approach that should always be followed to remind team members that no one is differently valued than others and that everyone is ‘equally’ a part of the success of the team.

Welcome Feedback and Suggestions
Teams do not go physically flat, they go mentally stale.” ~ Vincent Lombardi
Each and every person in the team is undoubtedly good at his or her work and that is the reason why they are there, right? Many times, in the monotony of following the leader and doing what is asked to be done, mentally stales the individual spark that can actually contribute to a remarkable idea that can add on to the success of the team. Which is why, another effective team communication strategy would be to give each and every team member a chance to voice their feedback and suggestions at any point of time. For this purpose, feedback forms and suggestion boxes should be introduced and someone should be appointed to analyze them periodically.

Everyone Gets to Participate
Strength lies in differences, not in similarities.” ~ Stephen Covey
… and a successful team is the one that can tap all these differences and unite them together to achieve a similar objective. For this, active and equal participation of each and every team member is a must. The fact that each and every person has a different perception can create problems at times, but it can also be a plus point. Total participation can lead to identification of a certain approach by one team member which wasn’t identifiable by others. Not only does this approach pave way for new advances, it also brings in a sense of belonging and importance among the team members, which definitely helps in improved unity, coordination and effective team work.

Appreciate Openly but Criticize Alone
communicating with the team members in terms of appreciation or criticism should also be done in the right manner. Always remember the key rule, ‘appreciate openly, but criticize when alone‘. Remember, every individual has other aspects of life that he or she is dealing with, which could intentionally or unintentionally, affect their performance on the professional front. Therefore, when it comes to appreciation, praise the contribution of the team member (also acknowledging the contribution of each and every team member) out in the open. Although, when it comes to criticism, make sure that instead of blaming the ‘one person’ out in the open, hold an individual meeting and try to understand the underlying causes. Be a good listener and offer help if possible. Because the contribution of each and every team member counts, make sure that frequent meetings or informal outings are held so that the team members are opened and comfortable enough to share their goals, both professional and personal. This helps in stronger bonding and better understanding, both of which are important for stronger team building.

Source: http://www.buzzle.com

Your Body Language during Interview

Your heart feels ready to leap out of your chest. Beads of sweat build on your forehead. Your mind is racing. It’s not a full-blown interrogation — although it may feel like it — it’s just a job interview. While it’s no secret that job interviews can be nerve-racking, a lot of job candidates spend a significant amount of time worrying about what they will say during their interview, only to blow it all with their body language. The old adage, “It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it,” still holds meaning, even if you’re not talking. You need to effectively communicate your professionalism both verbally and nonverbally.

Because watching your nonverbal cues, delivering concise answers and expressing your enthusiasm at once can be difficult when you’re nervous, here’s a guide to walk you through it:

Have them at “hello”

Before you walk into the interview, it’s assumed that you will have done the following: prepared yourself by reading up on the company and recent company news; practiced what you’ll say to some of the more common interview questions; and followed the “what to wear on your interview” advice. So you’re ready, right?

Some hiring managers claim they can spot a possible candidate for a job within 30 seconds or less, and while a lot of that has to do with the way you look, it’s also in your body language. Don’t walk in pulling up your pantyhose or readjusting your tie; pull yourself together before you stand up to greet the hiring manager or enter their office. Avoid a “dead fish” handshake and confidently — but not too firmly — grasp your interviewer’s hand and make eye contact while saying hello.

Shake your hand, watch yourself

If you are rocking back in your chair, shaking your foot, drumming your fingers or scratching your… anything, you’re going to look like you’re going to look the type of future employee who wouldn’t be able to stay focused, if even for a few minutes. It’s a not a game of charades, it’s a job interview. Here’s what to do (and not do):

Don’t:

  • Rub the back of your head or neck. Even if you really do just have a cramp in your neck, these gestures make you look disinterested.
  • Rub or touch your nose. This suggests that you’re not being completely honest, and it’s gross.
  • Sit with your armed folded across your chest. You’ll appear unfriendly and disengaged.
  • Cross your legs and idly shake one over the other. It’s distracting and shows how uncomfortable you are.
  • Lean your body towards the door. You’ll appear ready to make a mad dash for the door.
  • Slouch back in your seat. This will make you appear disinterested and unprepared.
  • Stare back blankly. This is a look people naturally adapt when they are trying to distance themselves.

    Do:

  • Sit up straight, and lean slightly forward in your chair. In addition to projecting interest and engagement in the interaction, aligning your body’s position to that of the interviewer’s shows admiration and agreement.
  • Show your enthusiasm by keeping an interested expression. Nod and make positive gestures in moderation to avoid looking like a bubblehead.
  • Establish a comfortable amount of personal space between you and the interviewer. Invading personal space (anything more than 20 inches) could make the interviewer feel uncomfortable and take the focus away from your conversation.
  • Limit your application of colognes and perfumes. Invading aromas can arouse allergies. Being the candidate that gave the interviewer a headache isn’t going to do anything in your favor.
  • If you have more than one person interviewing you at once, make sure you briefly address both people with your gaze (without looking like a tennis spectator) and return your attention to the person who has asked you a question.
  • Interruptions can happen. If they do, refrain from staring at your interviewer while they address their immediate business and motion your willingness to leave if they need privacy.
  • Stand up and smile even if you are on a phone interview. Standing increases your level of alertness and allows you to become more engaged in the conversation.

    Say Goodbye Gracefully

    After a few well-thought-out questions and answers with your interviewer, it’s almost over, but don’t lose your cool just yet. Make sure your goodbye handshake is just as confident now as it was going in. Keep that going while you walk through the office building, into the elevator and onto the street. Once safely in your car, a cab or some other measurable safe distance from the scene of your interview, it’s safe to let go. You may have aced it, but the last thing you want is some elaborate end-zone dance type of routine killing all your hard work at the last moment.

Source: http://www.careerbuilder.com

Prepare to stay cool for an Interview

Many find it extremely difficult to speak well in the interview. Nervousness will take over their hardwork too. A job interview is the perfect storm of anxiety for most job seekers. You’re put through a battery of questions. You’re expected to exude all of your good qualities without revealing your bad ones. You also need to get a feel for the company. Oh, and try to keep your nerves to a minimum — a jittery candidate could suggest someone hiding something or not qualified for the job.

Few job seekers walk into an interview without a considerable amount of anxiety in their bellies. While you can’t get rid of it all, you can learn how to control it so that you can give your best interview and get the job.

Start with homework

Your work begins once you have an interview scheduled. Hopefully you researched the company before applying for the job so you have some understanding of what the company does and stands for. But you still want more, and now is the time to dig deeper for relevant information.

“Know the mission or vision statement of the organization,” says Nancy Dachille, director of career services at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia. “Read the annual report, especially the CEO or president’s message. The more familiar you are with the organization, the more comfortable you will feel, especially at the end of the interview when the dreaded ‘Do you have any questions for us?’ question comes up.”

Anticipating that question and others is vital to your preparation. If you haven’t thought about what the interviewer will ask you, you’re liable to panic once you hear the question come out of his or her mouth. You’ll be so concerned with how you’ll answer that you might not even hear the entire question. A little planning can make the process easier, according to Helen Cooke, managing director for Cooke Consulting.

“Have some great accomplishments [at the top of your mind]. If you’ve practiced — without overdoing it — so that you have some succinct and compelling stories … you will walk in psychologically pumped up,” she says. She suggests that you choose specific examples to include in your stories so that you can point to cases where you improved a situation or brought in revenue for your employer. Not only are quantifiable achievements easier for employers to appreciate, but they’re also good talking points to have in your mind to keep you from panicking.

Cooke also encourages job seekers to look at previous job hunts for help with this one.

“Recalling past interview situations, I’m betting you can think of one or two interviewers who intimidated you during the interview and later, after you’d landed the job and been there for a while, you couldn’t believe you were intimidated by such a great, down-to-earth person,” she suggests.

The big day

You can prepare all you want, but when the interview is only hours away, another set of nerves kicks in. Your best defense is more preparation with regard to the logistics of the day, says John Thieman, a career development specialist at Stratford University in Falls Church, Va.

The night before the interview, he suggests getting your interview clothes ready and putting all your important documents near the door so that you can just grab them and go. This will eliminate as many potential delays as possible.

“Plan to rise even a little earlier than usual to prevent a nervous and rushed leaving the house and trip to the interview,” Thieman suggests. “Check the traffic reports and plan your route to avoid traffic surprises.”

Although you might think staying cool depends on your preparation for questions and body language during the interview itself — and it does — the fewer distractions you have getting to the interview will put you in the right mood. If you’re stuck in traffic, not sure where you’re going and wearing a wrinkled shirt, your confidence level is going to be pretty low when you arrive.

During the interview

The most important part of staying calm during the interview comes with preparation. Of course you have to answer plenty of questions and worry about body language — that never goes away. But if you’ve practiced your answers, thought about your posture and eye contact, and done your research on the company, the hard part’s over. Now you’re just answering questions that you’ve prepared for.

“Realize that a little nervousness is expected and that you only need to be calm enough to look competent and confident of your abilities,” says Sandra Naiman, author of “The High Achiever’s Secret Codebook: The Unwritten Rules for Success at Work.” “If you find yourself feeling overly anxious, stop to think a question over and take a few deep breaths.” After all, the interviewer knows you’re anxious and a hint of nerves shows that you care about the job.

Do all your pre-interview homework and let the rest just happen, suggests Naiman.

Source: http://www.careerbuilder.com

 

Tips for effective resume writing

Having a solid and effective resume can greatly improve your chances of landing that dream job. That is beyond discussion. How does one make sure that his resume is top notch and bullet proof, however?  We wanted to put them all the tips for good resume writing together in a single place, and that is what you will find below: 44 resume writing tips.
1. Know the purpose of your resume
Some people write a resume as if the purpose of the document was to land a job. As a result they end up with a really long and boring piece that makes them look like desperate job hunters. The objective of your resume is to land an interview, and the interview will land you the job (hopefully!).
2. Back up your qualities and strengths
Instead of creating a long (and boring) list with all your qualities (e.g., disciplined, creative, problem solver) try to connect them with real life and work experiences. In other words, you need to back these qualities and strengths up, else it will appear that you are just trying to inflate things.
3. Make sure to use the right keywords
Most companies (even smaller ones) are already using digital databases to search for candidates. This means that the HR department will run search queries based on specific keywords. Guess what, if your resume doesn’t have the keywords related to the job you are applying for, you will be out even before the game starts.
These keywords will usually be nouns. Check the job description and related job ads for a clue on what the employer might be looking for. You can read more about resume keywords on the article Tapping the Power of Keywords to Enhance Your Resume’s Effectiveness.
4. Use effective titles
Like it or not, employers will usually make a judgment about your resume in 5 seconds. Under this time frame the most important aspect will be the titles that you listed on the resume, so make sure they grab the attention. Try to be as descriptive as possible, giving the employer a good idea about the nature of your past work experiences. For example:
Bad title: Accounting
Good title: Management of A/R and A/P and Recordkeeping
5. Proofread it twice
It would be difficult to emphasize the importance of proofreading your resume. One small typo and your chances of getting hired could slip. Proofreading it once is not enough, so do it twice, three times or as many as necessary. If you don’t know how to proofread effectively, here are 8 tips that you can use.
6. Use bullet points
No employer will have the time (or patience) to read long paragraphs of text. Make sure, therefore, to use bullet points and short sentences to describe your experiences, educational background and professional objectives.
7. Where are you going?
Including professional goals can help you by giving employers an idea of where you are going, and how you want to arrive there. You don’t need to have a special section devoted to your professional objectives, but overall the resume must communicate it. The question of whether or not to highlight your career objectives on the resume is a polemic one among HR managers, so go with your feeling. If you decide to list them, make sure they are not generic.
8. Put the most important information first
This point is valid both to the overall order of your resume, as well as to the individual sections. Most of the times your previous work experience will be the most important part of the resume, so put it at the top. When describing your experiences or skills, list the most important ones first.
9. Attention to the typography
First of all make sure that your fonts are big enough. The smaller you should go is 11 points, but 12 is probably safer. Do not use capital letters all over the place, remember that your goal is to communicate a message as fast and as clearly as possible. Arial and Times are good choices.
10. Do not include “no kidding” information
There are many people that like to include statements like “Available for interview” or “References available upon request.” If you are sending a resume to a company, it should be a given that you are available for an interview and that you will provide references if requested. Just avoid items that will make the employer think “no kidding!”
11. Explain the benefits of your skills
Merely stating that you can do something will not catch the attention of the employer. If you manage to explain how it will benefit his company, and to connect it to tangible results, then you will greatly improve your chances.
12. Avoid negativity
Do not include information that might sound negative in the eyes of the employer. This is valid both to your resume and to interviews. You don’t need to include, for instance, things that you hated about your last company.
13. Achievements instead of responsibilities
Resumes that include a long list of “responsibilities included…” are plain boring, and not efficient in selling yourself. Instead of listing responsibilities, therefore, describe your professional achievements.
14. No pictures
Sure, we know that you are good looking, but unless you are applying for a job where the physical traits are very important (e.g., modeling, acting and so on), and unless the employer specifically requested it, you should avoid attaching your picture to the resume.
15. Use numbers
This tip is a complement to the 13th one. If you are going to describe your past professional achievements, it would be a good idea to make them as solid as possible. Numbers are your friends here. Don’t merely mention that you increased the annual revenues of your division, say that you increased them by $100,000, by 78%, and so on.
16. One resume for each employer
One of the most common mistakes that people make is to create a standard resume and send it to all the job openings that they can find. Sure it will save you time, but it will also greatly decrease the chances of landing an interview (so in reality it could even represent a waste of time). Tailor your resume for each employer. The same point applies to your cover letters.
17. Identify the problems of the employer
A good starting point to tailor your resume for a specific employer is to identify what possible problems he might have at hand. Try to understand the market of the company you are applying for a job, and identify what kind of difficulties they might be going through. After that illustrate on your resume how you and your skills would help to solve those problems.
18. Avoid age discrimination
It is illegal to discriminate people because of their age, but some employers do these considerations nonetheless. Why risk the trouble? Unless specifically requested, do not include your age on your resume.
19. You don’t need to list all your work experiences
If you have job experiences that you are not proud of, or that are not relevant to the current opportunity, you should just omit them. Mentioning that you used to sell hamburgers when you were 17 is probably not going to help you land that executive position.
20. Go with what you got
If you never had any real working experience, just include your summer jobs or volunteer work. If you don’t have a degree yet, mention the title and the estimated date for completion. As long as those points are relevant to the job in question, it does not matter if they are official or not.
21. Sell your fish
Remember that you are trying to sell yourself. As long as you don’t go over the edge, all the marketing efforts that you can put in your resume (in its content, design, delivery method and so on) will give you an advantage over the other candidates.
22. Don’t include irrelevant information
Irrelevant information such as political affiliation, religion and sexual preference will not help you. In fact it might even hurt your chances of landing an interview. Just skip it.
23. Use Mr. and Ms. if appropriate
If you have a gender neutral name like Alex or Ryan make sure to include the Mr. or Ms. prefix, so that employers will not get confused about your gender.
24. No lies, please
Seems like a no brainer, but you would be amused to discover the amount of people that lie in their resumes. Even small lies should be avoided. Apart from being wrong, most HR departments do background checks these days, and if you are buster it might ruin your credibility for good.
25. Keep the salary in mind
The image you will create with your resume must match the salary and responsibility level that you are aiming for.
26. Analyze job ads
You will find plenty of useful information on job ads. Analyze no only the ad that you will be applying for, but also those from companies on the same segment or offering related positions. You should be able to identify what profile they are looking for and how the information should be presented.
27. Get someone else to review your resume
Even if you think you resume is looking kinky, it would be a good idea to get a second and third opinion about it. We usually become blind to our own mistakes or way of reasoning, so another people will be in a good position to evaluate the overall quality of your resume and make appropriate suggestions.
28. One or two pages
The ideal length for a resume is a polemic subject. Most employers and recruiting specialists, however, say that it should contain one or two pages at maximum. Just keep in mind that, provided all the necessary information is there, the shorter your resume, the better.
29. Use action verbs
A very common advice to job seekers is to use action verbs. But what are they? Action verbs are basically verbs that will get noticed more easily, and that will clearly communicate what your experience or achievement were. Examples include managed, coached, enforced and planned. Here you can find a complete list of action verbs divided by skill category.
30. Use a good printer
If you are going to use a paper version of your resume, make sure to use a decent printer. Laser printers usually get the job done. Plain white paper is the preferred one as well.
31. No hobbies
Unless you are 100% sure that some of your hobbies will support you candidacy, avoid mentioning them. I know you are proud of your swimming team, but share it with your friends and not with potential employers.
32. Update your resume regularly
It is a good idea to update your resume on a regular basis. Add all the new information that you think is relevant, as well as courses, training programs and other academic qualifications that you might receive along the way. This is the best way to keep track of everything and to make sure that you will not end up sending an obsolete document to the employer.
33. Mention who you worked with
If you have reported or worked with someone that is well known in your industry, it could be a good idea to mention it on the resume. The same thing applies to presidents and CEOs. If you reported to or worked directly with highly ranked executives, add it to the resume.
34. No scattered information
Your resume must have a clear focus. If would cause a negative impression if you mentioned that one year you were studying drama, and the next you were working as an accountant. Make sure that all the information you will include will work towards a unified image. Employers like decided people.
35. Make the design flow with white space
Do not jam your resume with text. Sure we said that you should make your resume as short and concise as possible, but that refers to the overall amount of information and not to how much text you can pack in a single sheet of paper. White space between the words, lines and paragraphs can improve the legibility of your resume.
36. Lists all your positions
If you have worked a long time for the same company (over 10 years) it could be a good idea to list all the different positions and roles that you had during this time separately. You probably had different responsibilities and developed different skills on each role, so the employer will like to know it.
37. No jargon or slang
It should be common sense, but believe me, it is not. Slang should never be present in a resume. As for technical jargon, do not assume that the employer will know what you are talking about. Even if you are sending your resume to a company in the same segment, the person who will read it for the first time might not have any technical expertise.
38. Careful with sample resume templates
There are many websites that offer free resume templates. While they can help you to get an idea of what you are looking for, do not just copy and paste one of the most used ones. You certainly don’t want to look just like any other candidate, do you?
39. Create an email proof formatting
It is very likely that you will end up sending your resume via email to most companies. Apart from having a Word document ready to go as an attachment, you should also have a text version of your resume that does not look disfigured in the body of the email or in online forms. Attachments might get blocked by spam filters, and many people just prefer having the resume on the body of the email itself.
40. Remove your older work experiences
If you have been working for 20 years or more, there is no need to have 2 pages of your resume listing all your work experiences, starting with the job at the local coffee shop at the age of 17! Most experts agree that the last 15 years of your career are enough.
41. No fancy design details
Do not use a colored background, fancy fonts or images on your resume. Sure, you might think that the little flowers will cheer up the document, but other people might just throw it away at the sight.
42. No pronouns
You resume should not contain the pronouns “I” or “me.” That is how we normally structure sentences, but since your resume is a document about your person, using these pronouns is actually redundant.
43. Don’t forget the basics
The first thing on your resume should be your name. It should be bold and with a larger font than the rest of the text. Make sure that your contact details are clearly listed. Secondly, both the name and contact details should be included on all the pages of the resume (if you have more than one).
44. Consider getting professional help
If you are having a hard time to create your resume, or if you are receiving no response whatsoever from companies, you could consider hiring a professional resume writing service. There are both local and online options are available, and usually the investment will be worth the money.

Source:www.dailywritingtips.com

AZIM PREMJI’S LESSONS IN LIFE

First  

The first thing I have learnt is that we must always begin with our strengths. There is an imaginary story of a rabbit. The rabbit was enrolled in a rabbit school. Like all rabbits, it could hop very well but could not swim. At the end of the year, the rabbit got high marks in hopping but failed in swimming. The parents were concerned. They said, ‘Forget about hopping. You are, anyway good at it. Concentrate on swimming.’ They sent the rabbit for tuitions in swimming. And guess what happened? The rabbit forgot how to hop! As for swimming, have you ever seen a rabbit swim? While it is important for us to know what we are not good at, we must also cherish what is good in us. That is because it is only our strengths that can give us the energy to correct our weaknesses.

Second

The second lesson I have learnt is that a rupee earned is of far more value than five found. My friend was sharing with me, the story of his eight year-old niece. She would always complain about the breakfast. The cook tried everything possible, but the child remained unhappy. Finally, my friend took the child to a supermarket and brought one of those ready-to-cook cereal packets. The child had to cut the packet and pour water in the dish. The child found the food to be absolutely delicious? The difference was that she had cooked it! In my own life, I have found that nothing gives as much satisfaction as earning our own rewards. In fact, what is gifted or inherited follows the old rule of ‘come easy, go easy’. I guess we only know the value of what we have, if we have struggled to earn it.

Third

The third lesson I have learnt is, in Cricket, no one bats a hundred every time. Life has many challenges. You win some and lose some. You must enjoy winning. But do not let it go to the head. The moment it does, you are already on your way to failure. And if you do encounter failure along the way, treat it as an equally natural phenomenon. Don’t beat yourself for it or anyone else for that matter! Accept it, look at your own share in the problem, learn from it and move on. The important thing is, when you lose, do not ‘lose the lesson’.

Fourth

The fourth lesson I have learnt, is the importance of humility. Sometimes, when you get so much in life, you really start wondering, whether you deserve all of it. We have so much to be grateful for. Our parents, our teachers and our seniors, have done so much for us, that we can never repay them. Many people focus on the shortcomings, because obviously, no one can be perfect. But it is important to first acknowledge, what we have received. Nothing in life is permanent, but when a relationship ends, rather than becoming bitter, we must learn to savor the memory, of the good things, while they lasted.

Fifth

The fifth lesson I learnt is, that we must always strive for excellence. One way of achieving excellence, is by looking at those better than ourselves. Keep learning what they do differently. But excellence cannot be imposed from the outside. We must also feel the need from within. It must involve not only our mind, but also our heart and soul. Excellence is not an act, but a habit. I remember the inspiring lines of a poem, which says that your reach must always exceed your grasp. That is heaven on earth. Ultimately, your only competition is yourself.

Sixth

The sixth lesson I have learnt is, never give up in the face of adversity. It comes on you, suddenly without warning.. Always keep in mind, that it is only the test of fire, that makes fine steel. A friend of mine shared this incident with me. His eight-year old daughter was struggling away at a jigsaw puzzle. She kept at it for hours but could not succeed. Finally, it went beyond her bedtime. My friend told her, “Look, why don’t you just give up? I don’t think you will complete it tonight. Look at it another day.” The daughter looked with a strange look in her eyes, “But, dad, why should I give up? All the pieces are there! I have just got to put them together!” If we persevere long enough, we can put any problem into its perspective.

Seventh

The seventh lesson I have learnt is, that while you must be open to change, do not compromise on your values. Mahatma Gandhiji often said, “You must open the windows of your mind, but you must not be swept off your feet by the breeze.” Values like honesty, integrity, consideration and humility have survived for generations. At the end of the day, it is values that define a person more than the achievements. Do not be tempted by short cuts. The short cut can make you lose your way and end up becoming the longest way to the destination.

Final

And the final lesson I learnt is, that we must have faith in our own ideas even if everyone tells us that we are wrong. There was once a newspaper vendor who had a rude customer. Every morning, the Customer would walk by, refuse to return the greeting, grab the paper off the shelf and throw the money at the vendor. The vendor would pick up the money, smile politely and say, ‘Thank you, Sir.’ One day, the vendor’s assistant asked him, “Why are you always so polite with him when he is so rude to you? Why don’t you throw the newspaper at him when he comes back tomorrow?” The vendor smiled and replied, “He can’t help being rude and I can’t help being polite. Why should I let his rude behavior dictate my politeness? ”

source: internet

The Struggle Story

A man found a cocoon of a butterfly.
One day a small opening appeared.
He sat and watched the butterfly for several hours
as it struggled to squeeze its body through the tiny hole.
Then it stopped, as if it couldn’t go further.

So the man decided to help the butterfly.
He took a pair of scissors and
snipped off the remaining bits of cocoon.
The butterfly emerged easily but
it had a swollen body and shriveled wings.

The man continued to watch it,
expecting that any minute the wings would enlarge
and expand enough to support the body,
Neither happened!
In fact the butterfly spent the rest of its life
crawling around.
It was never able to fly.

What the man in his kindness
and haste did not understand:
The restricting cocoon and the struggle
required by the butterfly to get through the opening
was a way of forcing the fluid from the body
into the wings so that it would be ready
for flight once that was achieved.

Sometimes struggles are exactly
what we need in our lives.
Going through life with no obstacles would cripple us.
We will not be as strong as we could have been
and we would never fly.

Source: http://www.motivational-well-being.com

Cross Culture Communication…..Collaborative Efforts a Must!

“We didn’t all come over on the same ship, but we’re all in the same boat.”

– Bernard Baruch, American financier and statesman

It’s no secret that today’s workplace is rapidly becoming vast, as the business environment expands to include various geographic locations and span numerous cultures. What can be difficult, however, understands how to communicate effectively with individuals who speak another language or who rely on different means to reach a common goal…

Cross-Cultural Communication – The New Norm

The Internet and modern technology have opened up new marketplaces, and allow us to promote our businesses to new geographic locations and cultures. And given that it can now be as easy to work with people remotely as it is to work face-to-face, cross-cultural communication is increasingly the new norm.

After all, if communication is electronic, it’s as easy to work with someone in another country as it is to work with someone in the next town.

And why limit yourself to working with people within convenient driving distance when, just as conveniently, you can work with the most knowledgeable people in the entire world?

For those of us who are native English-speakers, it is fortunate that English seems to be the language that people use if they want to reach the widest possible audience. However, even for native English speakers, cross-cultural communication can be an issue: Just witness the mutual incomprehension that can sometimes arise between people from different English-speaking countries.

In this new world, good cross-cultural communication is a must.

Understanding Cultural Diversity

Given different cultural contexts, this brings new communication challenges to the workplace. Even when employees located in different locations or offices speak the same language (for instance, correspondences between English-speakers in the U.S. and English-speakers in the UK), there are some cultural differences that should be considered in an effort to optimize communications between the two parties.

In such cases, an effective communication strategy begins with the understanding that the sender of the message and the receiver of the message are from different cultures and backgrounds. Of course, this introduces a certain amount of uncertainty, making communications even more complex.

Without getting into cultures and sub-cultures, it is perhaps most important for people to realize that a basic understanding of cultural diversity is the key to effective cross-cultural communications. Without necessarily studying individual cultures and languages in detail, we must all learn how to better communicate with individuals and groups whose first language, or language of choice, does not match our own.

Developing Awareness of Individual Cultures

However, some learning the basics about culture and at least something about the language of communication in different countries is important. This is necessary even for the basic level of understanding required to engage in appropriate greetings and physical contact, which can be a tricky area inter-culturally. For instance, kissing a business associate is not considered an appropriate business practice in the U.S., but in Paris, one peck on each cheek is an acceptable greeting. And, the handshake that is widely accepted in the U.S. is not recognized in all other cultures.

While many companies now offer training in the different cultures where the company conducts business, it is important that employees communicating across cultures practice patience and work to increase their knowledge and understanding of these cultures. This requires the ability to see that a person’s own behaviors and reactions are oftentimes culturally driven and that while they may not match are own, they are culturally appropriate.

If a leader or manager of a team that is working across cultures or incorporates individuals who speak different languages, practice different religions, or are members of a society that requires a new understanding, he or she needs to work to convey this.

Consider any special needs the individuals on your team may have. For instance, they may observe different holidays, or even have different hours of operation. Be mindful of time zone differences and work to keep everyone involved aware and respectful of such differences.

Generally speaking, patience, courtesy and a bit of curiosity go a long way. And, if you are unsure of any differences that may exist, simply ask team members. Again, this may best be done in a one-on-one setting so that no one feels “put on the spot” or self-conscious, perhaps even embarrassed, about discussing their own needs or differences or needs.

Demand Tolerance

Next, cultivate and demand understanding and tolerance. In doing this, a little education will usually do the trick. Explain to team members that the part of the team that works out of the Australia office, for example, will be working in a different time zone, so electronic communications and/or return phone calls will experience a delay. And, members of the India office will also observe different holidays (such as Mahatma Gandhi’s Birthday, observed on Oct. 2).

Most people will appreciate the information and will work hard to understand different needs and different means used to reach common goals. However, when this is not the case, lead by example and make it clear that you expect to be followed down a path of open-mindedness, acceptance and tolerance.

Tip:
Tolerance is essential; however you need to maintain standards of acceptable behavior. The following “rules of thumb” seem universal:

  • Team members should contribute to and not hinder the team’s mission or harm the delivery to the team’s customer.
  • Team members should not damage the cohesion of the team or prevent it from becoming more effective.
  • Team members should not unnecessarily harm the interests of other team members.

Other factors (such as national law) are obviously important.

When dealing with people in a different culture, courtesy and goodwill can also go a long way in ensuring successful communication. Again, this should be insisted on.

If your starting point in solving problems is to assume that communication has failed, you’ll find that many problems are quickly resolved.

Keep It Simple

When you communicate, keep in mind that even though English is considered the international language of business, it is a mistake to assume that every businessperson speaks good English. In fact, only about half of the 800 million people who speak English learned it as a first language. And, those who speak it as a second language are often more limited than native speakers.

When you communicate cross-culturally, make particular efforts to keeping your communication clear, simple and unambiguous.

And (sadly) avoid humor until you know that the person you’re communicating with “gets it” and isn’t offended by it. Humor is notoriously culture-specific: Many things that pass for humor in one culture can be seen as grossly offensive in another.

And Get Help If You Need It

Finally, if language barriers present themselves, it may be in every one’s best interest to employ a reliable, experienced translator.

Because English is not the first language of many international businesspeople, their use of the language may be peppered with culture-specific or non-standard English phrases, which can hamper the communication process. Again, having a translator on hand (even if just during the initial phases of work) may be the best solution here. The translator can help everyone involved to recognize cultural and communication differences and ensure that all parties, regardless of geographic location and background, come together and stay together through successful project completion.

Source: http://www.mindtools.com